Marrakech


5 things you HAVE to do in Marrakech...
An easy read to sum up my trip there in September and a few tips and tricks. 


1. Visit Marrakech's history 
Go into merrekech and explore it for yourself. Don't be tempted to be a lazy brit on holiday and follow the crowd. Being a young blonde female, I can understand someone's reluctancy about walking around alone in a north african country. But the locals are much more friendly and less aggressive than other northern african countries I've been to. 










2. The heat in Morocco is a perfect tanning weather. Not too hot to be sweating but warm enough to get a deep tan. 




3. Market square, one of THE main attractions in Marrakech. Thousands of Souks (stalls to me and you) with traders selling you everything and anything. Wise up on your exchange rate though, its easy to get flustered with pricing half way through a deal. You can buy anything from traditional spices to live animals. 



They have live animals in the square such as monkey etc and also snake charmers, but don't try and take any pictures of them as they will charge you a small fortune for it. But that aside, the shopping is amazing and walking through the souks make you feel like you're in Aladdin...or whatever the equivalent is. 



4. Hammam, one which you have to try. Me and my Mum wanted to treat ourselves and go to the spa. But there is a traditional Moroccan treatment which we just had to try. Its  called a Hammam, which is a process of steaming, exfoliating and using oils to enhance your tan and re-junvinate the skin. We had the treatment 2 days into the holiday, to prolong our tan. It was very funny as the woman didn't speak any english and therefore was quite rough with the treatment. But she got the job done and my skin felt incredible afterwards. 


5. Yves Saint Laurent Gardens, my favourite part of the whole trip. Amongst the dusty city is this green oasis, designed by the late Yves Saint Laurent and actually where his ashes are spread. It is so beautiful, you could spend hours in there. 




What we (as in the western world) would consider a 'Moroccan' style is in fact been influenced by the french when they invaded.